How to Use Also, Furthermore, Moreover, and Besides?

Some students are wondering how they should use also, furthermore, moreover, and besides to achieve correct transitions. Here is an example for you.

My sister believes that McD is the best restaurant in town, but I think that KFC can beat it. The well-known actor Amy has endorsed KFC. The famous comedian Luke also thinks highly of KFC. Furthermore, food scientists indicate that KFC sells more nutritious food. Moreover, KFC itself highlights the nutritional value. In light of the overwhelming celebrity endorsement and the remarkable nutritiousness, I should say that KFC is definitely a better choice. Besides, my sister has been to McD only once and has never been to KFC, whereas I have experienced all the restaurants in town.

Now let’s break down the reasons why I believe KFC can beat McD:
1. Celebrity 1 (Amy) says KFC is good;
2. Celebrity 2 (Luke) says KFC is good;
3. Food scientists say KFC is good;
4. KFC itself has a good business concept;
5. My sister is underqualified for praising McD.

Analysis:
1 ← 2 : simple addition
1 ← 2 | 3 : scientists’ opinion parallel to celebrities‘
1 ← 2 | 3 [4] : KFC’s business concept (on a different level)
1 ← 2 | 3 [4] *5 : my sister’s lack of knowledge as a “bonus”

Bottom line:
(i) also – simple addition;
(ii) furthermore – to pile up evidence with a parallel reason;
(iii) moreover – to pile up evidence with a different kind of reason;
(iv) besides – [a] to indicate that the previous reason(s) is (are) already perfect and here is one more little thing to mention. You can accept it happily as a bonus. – [b] to indicate that even if the previous reason(s) is (are) unconvincing or erroneous, here is one more thing that will make the whole argument unworthy of a conclusion. You have no alternative but to accept it and forgo any conclusion.